Why a fear of labels can cause more damage than calling it like it is.

I just say, ‘he has schizophrenia.’You know, it is what it is!

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Throughout the process of creating our collection of stories for our Behind the Wall project, most parents we interviewed had already passed through the hurdle of acceptance, or as one very astute parent clarified, she’d reached “radical acceptance”. (See post entitled, “Radical Acceptance” dated June 26, 2013.) Most of the parents we interviewed were living in the fluid state of “What do we do now?” And in the same way a yogi practices yoga, rather than ever fully mastering it, these parents practice the daily inhale/exhale of living with grief while also caring for one’s own well being. We’ve said it many times before: these parents are inspiring.

During one interview, however, a parent described her child’s illness without offering to share the psychiatrist’s diagnosis, insisting instead, “We don’t use labels.”

The stigma attached to serious mental illness is detrimental to those diagnosed and their loved ones. “We don’t use labels” means, “We won’t really say what the illness is because I don’t think my child can handle knowing it and neither can I. I don’t want others treating her differently.” This way of thinking is not uncommon when parents first learn their child’s diagnosis.

A diagnosis of a serious mental illness such as bipolar, schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia, or serious depression, often comes after challenging chaos and endangering incidents. Frequently, the most accurate diagnosis is preceded by several near misses. Settling on a correct diagnosis can be a complicated process. So when a parent hears, “Serious mental illness,” it makes sense to wonder, “Is that really it? Are we jumping to conclusions?”

These are sentiments many Behind the Wall parents harbored while moving toward acceptance. After her son was diagnosed, Bianca would sometimes think, “Schizophrenia? Maybe he’s just having a bad day. Maybe he just smoked too much weed.” Or, she’d say, “Maybe it’s bipolar. Because bipolar is more socially acceptable than schizophrenia!” All the while, she knew her son was very ill.

But not addressing the illness directly inhibits acceptance by loved ones, the caregiver, and most critically the ill person. An individual living with serious mental illness simply cannot reach recovery without accepting the diagnosis and treatment required to effectively manage the illness. Maybe a parent refuses to “label” because she doesn’t want her child to believe he is flawed or less of a person. One may fear the child will use the diagnosis as a crutch or excuse. A parent doesn’t want her child to be treated “differently.”

Life is more difficult with any untreated illness. 

Here’s something to consider: a person living with untreated mental illness already knows she is different in some way. Life is more difficult with any untreated illness. And those who are in recovery almost always recognize the importance of owning their illness and calling it what it is: a challenging, incurable condition that was not caused as consequence of their own doing.

And while society and the media are still slow to come around to speaking accurately about mental illness, when a person’s immediate community accepts the illness without confluence of inferiority, so will the diagnosed individual. When loved ones rally to support a lifestyle conducive to managing the illness, that is, treats him (differently) with perhaps more compassion and understanding, his life gets better the same way a person managing diabetes must be supported in his lifestyle requirements.

 it is what it is

Decades ago, our mother reminded us, that a person would never announce his cancer diagnosis, likely because it was a death sentence. Also, it was terribly impolite. But today there are good treatments and website pages where a person announces his illness, his stage of recovery, and welcomes supportive posts from loved ones. Even money for healthcare is accepted. As it should be.

Today, serious mental illnesses can be managed too. There are set backs. But those who have the best chance for recovery are those who own the illness, accept the diagnosis and treatment. As it should be.

Let’s talk about mental illness in a real way. There is hope. It’s a serious illness that needs proper due.

 

Your comments are welome.

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