The countdown to 18

18-2

Sometimes it seems to happen overnight. In other cases, parents know there is something different about one’s child from an early age. When it hits suddenly, a parent may see signs of mental illness creeping up only in hindsight.

No matter the evolution or specific diagnosis, the journey of parenting a child with mental illness is an unfathomable challenge, unimaginable to those who have not been the parent and witnessed scenarios that even in the retelling are difficult to believe. When a child becomes increasingly symptomatic, chaos erupts in the household and the lives of each family member are affected. Not just a little, but significantly. Managing this chaos while searching for solutions for the ill family member can feel overwhelming. Yet parents get through it. The Behind the Wall parents we interviewed describe the early stages of the illness in similar terms as the steep learning curve of boot camp training with an over abundance of emotional turmoil. But the learning curve sharpens parents into invaluable advocates in managing treatment for their child; they hold the whole health history from the smallest obscure observations to the concrete details of hospitalizations and medications.

Parents and families can be integral to the recovery process. Statistically, there is a higher rate of recovery for those who are well supported by a loved one and this is usually the parent. They work harder than anyone at keeping their child safe. They fight for a diagnosis and treatment and are usually best positioned to encourage compliance. Sometimes, they even enforce treatment because they know it’s best.

But then their child turns eighteen.

Says one Behind the Wall parent, “I wanted to help my son, but I was prevented from doing so.” What a difference a day makes. At eighteen, because of HIPAA (health privacy laws), parents are effectively excised from their child’s treatment team.

After a recent mass shooting (pick one) many commentaries in the media sphere asked, “Why didn’t the parents do more to prevent this?” I’ll concede discussions of gun laws to others. And while it’s unfair to conflate violence with serious mental illness because statistics don’t bear this connection, these incidents bring the stigmatized topic of mental illness bubbling to the surface. And as an advocate, one must seize the conversation to explain that there are a myriad of reasons why a parent doesn’t have all the power to help an adult child living with serious mental illness, and the important ones hinge on eighteen.

Even when symptoms of one’s illness are present throughout a child’s whole life, behaviors often become more severe during teens and early twenties. It can take months, even years to obtain a proper diagnosis and treatment particularly when substance use is involved. It is not uncommon for a person to try several medications before finding one, or a cocktail of as many as seven at a time, to become stable not to mention functional. What may work for a year may need to be reduced, increased, or changed later. In Andrew Solomon’s New Yorker article, “The Reckoning,” Peter Lanza, whose son was the Newtown shooter, describes how Adam was given medication that caused him serious side effects. It is inferred that the medication trial did not proceed. Adam refused treatment. Usually one must try several before getting it right, though convincing a person to try medications that make one feel lousy, at least at first, is easier said than done and truthfully, all medications have some side effect. A feature common to serious mental illness, anosognosia, is defined as the inability of a person to comprehend he or she is experiencing mental illness. And it’s another serious impediment to convincing one into treatment compliance. If a parent is fortunate to obtain a diagnosis and a treatment plan that has promise for their child, it offers hope that the individual will stabilize and recognize just how ill they were before treatment. But tick tock; the clock counts down to the magic hour of one’s eighteenth birthday.

. . .expecting a person who is experiencing psychosis to willingly sign a release, much less ask the medical staff that he wishes to do so is at times, unrealistic.

Treatment cannot be enforced on a person who is over eighteen and unless one’s child signs a HIPAA release, the person(s) who hold the whole medical history, the parent, can effectively be excluded from healthcare decisions. Parents have told us they call their child’s therapist and say, “I know you cannot tell me anything, so I’ll feed you information.” It bears pointing out that expecting a person who is experiencing psychosis to willingly sign a release, much less ask the medical staff that he wishes to do so is at times, unrealistic. Kerri, a Behind the Wall contributor, tried bringing clothes to the hospital that her son called to request. But because he forgot to sign HIPAA papers, and forgot to tell her where he was, she couldn’t bring his clothes or even visit him for days. Losing a healthcare advocate in a parent because of the over-eighteen law presents serious dangers considering that a parent knows through shared experience how a certain medication has triggered mania for their child, for example, or severe and lethal tachycardia.

Fortunately, these barriers that parents encounter have become a salient to mental healthcare discussions and better yet, to proposed legislation (see links below for information about Murphy’s Law.)

No person in this known world excuses violence perpetrated by a person who lives with mental illness or experiencing psychosis. Those who do live with and successfully manage their mental illness most certainly don’t accept this message. Instead of asking, “Why didn’t the parents do something to prevent this?” Perhaps the real question is, “How can we address this over-age-eighteen issue?”

Because the truth is, these parents need our support not our judgment.

 ♦

 

Andrew Solomon, “The Reckoning” New Yorker: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2014/03/17/140317fa_fact_solomon?currentPage=all

 

 

Comments are always welcome:

 

Recommended links regarding proposed mental health legislation:

OP-ED: Overhaul of mental health care long overdue, by Rep. Tim Murphy, Philadelphia Inquirer (January 26, 2014)

Mental Healthcare in the U.S. Needs a Check-Up, Editorial Board of the Washington Post (April 16, 2014)

Better Care for the Mentally Ill is Crucial for Our Society, Dr. Cyril Wecht, M.D., J.D. for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (April 13, 2014)

Worthy of Support, editors of the Toledo Blade (April 9, 2014)

Worthy of Support: Murphy’s Mental Health Bill Faces the Critics, editors of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (April 6. 2014)

The Definition of Insanity, editors of the Wall Street Journal (March 31, 2014)

A Mental Health Overhaul, editors of the Wall Street Journal (December 26, 2013)

Sound Off: Mental Health Reform Needed to Aid Patients, Dottie Pacharis for The News-Press (Fort Myers, FL)

We need to take a proactive approach with mental illness, Guest Opinion by Liza Long (author of “I Am Adam Lanza’s Mother”) in the Idaho Statesman (January 13, 2014)

A Law to Fix Mental Health Care, Dr. Sally Satel for Bloomberg (December 22, 2013)

All in the Family: Mental Illness and Caregiving Across the Generations, Rachel Pruchno, Ph.D. for Psychology Today (January 15, 2014)

New Bill Decreases Mental Health Funding, Increases Mental Illness Funding, DJ Jaffe for Huffington Post (December 18, 2013)

Murphy’s bill a step toward mental health reform, Observer-Reporter (Washington, PA), (December 21, 2013)

San Fran should take up Laura’s Law again, Amy Yanello, San Francisco Chronicle (December 20, 2013)

Rep. Murphy’s Bill Would Shift Focus: Make Major Changes In Mental Health Care, Pete Earley, journalist and father of mentally ill son

Advertisements

2 Comments on “The countdown to 18”

  1. judyabl says:

    Excellent points made! The same questions could be asked of mental health professionals who knew the person-but, in truth, no one can predict actions and the laws that are in place to protect human rights and dignity of all concerned are sometimes a double edged sword. Instead of judging and blaming we need to work hard to create possibilities of intervention- broadening the typical “danger to self or others” from having to see the gun in hand to the softer and yet insistent signs that are cries for help. Dealing with “18” is very important for all of us who care about those who carry a mental illness at any age.

    Like

    • Mary says:

      Thank you for your comments, Judy!

      I think one of my next posts may have to address those “softer and yet insistent signs that are cries for help.” Because until we, that is professionals and parents, are brave enough to admit that these signs are worth noting, and addressing, a person doesn’t get effective treatment. And 72 hours is not quite enought time to stabilize a person whose brain has been on fire.

      Again, thanks for your comments.
      Hoe you are well!

      Mary

      Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s